www.TrendsInAdvertising.com
Brought to you by Communicus
What Automotive Marketers Can Learn From Insurance Brands
Nov03

What Automotive Marketers Can Learn From Insurance Brands

One industry is thrilling, the other is boring – but the dull one is doing a much better job at advertising.

Read More
How to Leverage System 1 Dynamics for Advertising Success
Sep19

How to Leverage System 1 Dynamics for Advertising Success

Yes, the hype is deserved.

Read More
Fresh Data: 99% of B2B Ads Fall Short
Apr20

Fresh Data: 99% of B2B Ads Fall Short

How to be part of the 1% of B2B campaigns that deliver results.

Read More
Taglines as Tag-Alongs
May05

Taglines as Tag-Alongs

We’ve commented in this space before about how brand marketers care more about their taglines than consumers do. Not only do consumers typically not care, they are mostly unable to link taglines with the brands to which they are attached. Sure, there some exceptions – Just do it; Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there; I’m lovin it to name a few. These are unquestionably strong, sticky lines – and they’ve had billions of advertising dollars in advertising support over the years. But most taglines never earn this kind of notice or acclaim. Taglines often serve to unite the brand team and the agency behind a what they’ve all agreed is a core brand truth. But when the team conceives of the tagline as the uniting force across ad elements that otherwise have little to nothing in common, that’s where the unfounded belief in the power of the tagline goes seriously awry. Recently released ARF research highlights two important insights that are relevant to this topic – two insights that we also have found to be true over many years of studying how advertising works. First, the best performing cross-platform campaigns contain common creative elements across platforms. We know that these common elements help consumers to link all of the different pieces of content to the same brand – an important function given the widespread problems with brand linkage in today’s advertising environment. Additionally, these common elements act as memory triggers – reminding consumers when they see an ad in one venue of the brand communications they’ve seen elsewhere – thus producing an amplification of persuasive impact. And second, using brain wave analysis, the ARF observed that consumers pay hardly any attention to the taglines that appear at the end of video ads. The story’s over, time to tune out. We’ve seen the same thing – which also by the way is true of commercial end tags, but that’s another story for another day. Our observation has been that the tagline acts like the period at the end of the sentence. ‘Okay, that’s over – what’s next?’ This helps to explain why taglines, unless they are incorporated into the story, or unless they are central to the telling of the story, are so often not remembered at all. Let’s put these two observations side by side – campaigns need common threads and taglines aren’t noticed or remembered. This tells us that campaigns that are tied together through the use of a tagline aren’t really tied together at all, and thus are not going to work as hard for a brand as the brand team hopes. The moral of...

Read More
Super Bowl 50 Advertising Sells-Out at Record Nearly $5 Million for :30; What Can Advertisers Expect in Return?
Jan22

Super Bowl 50 Advertising Sells-Out at Record Nearly $5 Million for :30; What Can Advertisers Expect in Return?

Communicus has evaluated the effectiveness of over 150 Super Bowl commercials between 2011 and 2015. Advertisers who have invested the $5 million or more[…]

Read More
Why the #1 Problem with Advertising is the Easiest to Fix
May07

Why the #1 Problem with Advertising is the Easiest to Fix

There are an infinite amount of variables that an advertiser can control to maximize the success of a marketing program. It starts with how to position the brand, which media to use and how to allocate the investment. The puzzle is getting even more complex with the emergence of programmatic buying, second screen opportunities, native advertising, social media vehicles, and all of the other trendy tools out there today. But if we step back from all of the trends and all of the intricacies of marketing, what it really comes down to is creative. This is what determines the effectiveness of a marketing campaign (yes, it’s even more important than the amount of money you have to spend). And the number one place where creative falls short is the simplest, but often forgotten task – assuring that those who see an advertisement link it back to the correct brand. That’s right – Brand Linkage is the #1 problem with advertising, and it’s the easiest to fix. Take television for example – 56% of those with proven awareness of a given TV commercial do not know what brand was being advertised. That’s over half of the earned audience members who are essentially wasted. The problem is even worse for media like promotions (67% of those aware don’t know the brand) and radio (78% of those aware don’t know the brand). And unfortunately, based on our research, there’s no subliminal advertising effects. Those who see your ad but don’t link it back to your brand demonstrate the same changes over time (in brand favorability) as those who do not see your ad at all. So how do you fix it? We provide some fundamental solutions in this article, this article and this white paper. Sometimes, it’s as simple as making Brand Linkage a priority in creative development and pre-testing. One of our clients was able to improve Brand Linkage for their portfolio of brands by over 200% over a 9 year period of working with Communicus, just by changing the way that the organization thinks about creative. Just think of all of the marketing dollars you could not be...

Read More
Page 1 of 212