www.TrendsInAdvertising.com
Brought to you by Communicus
How to Avoid Analytic Traps That Can Ruin Your Brand Among Hispanic Consumers
Feb22

How to Avoid Analytic Traps That Can Ruin Your Brand Among Hispanic Consumers

With $1.5 trillion in annual spend in the United States every year, Hispanic consumers comprise a vital segment for many brands. Yet there are several errors commonly made by brands in measuring the effectiveness of their advertising to Hispanic consumers. For Mediapost’s Engage: Hispanics, one of Communicus’ multicultural advertising experts, Aleena Astorga Roeschley, details these mistakes – and how to avoid them. You can hear Aleena and Communicus CEO Jeri Smith go into more detail on this subject on March 1 at The Quirk’s Event in Orange County, California. There, they will co-present on the topic “How to Avoid the Analytic Traps That Can Ruin Your Brand Among Hispanic Consumers.”...

Read More
Super Bowl 50 En Español!
Feb11

Super Bowl 50 En Español!

At first glance, the idea of a Spanish-language airing of the Super Bowl doesn’t seem to make a lot of sense. After all, football is a quintessentially American sport. You’d think that more acculturated Hispanics would be perfectly happy to view the big game on CBS, with their buddies who are accustomed to watching English-language TV. And those who are less acculturated, who don’t tend to consume a lot of English-language media, wouldn’t be interested in football – preferring fútbol…

Read More
Bicultural Hispanics: Who Are They and Why Should Marketers Be Paying Attention?
Dec30

Bicultural Hispanics: Who Are They and Why Should Marketers Be Paying Attention?

Hispanics are a rapidly growing segment of the US consumer base, with buying power expected to surpass $1.6 billion by 2019, based on forecasts from the Selig Center for Economic Growth. Within the US Hispanic population sits a subset of bicultural Hispanics—first- or second-generation citizens who grew up in the US. Aleena Astorga Roeschley spoke with eMarketer’s Alison McCarthy about who these bicultural Hispanics are and what opportunities they offer marketers. Click HERE for...

Read More
Play Offense, Not Defense to Win Hispanic Engagement
May28

Play Offense, Not Defense to Win Hispanic Engagement

Everyone knows that Hispanics are a fast growing, key group of consumers in the marketplace, but do advertisers’ investments reflect that? In a recent Media Post article, Jose Villa writes about the visible trend of marketers increasing investments in the Hispanic Market as a defensive move. Advertisers are experiencing decreases in sales among their General Market target, so they then decide to invest money behind strategies that would specifically target Hispanics. Is leaving advertising to the Hispanic consumer as a “last resort” the right move to make? Probably not. Villa details how various elements, such as demographic, technological, and consumer preference shifts are creating headwinds for bigger brands in the marketplace and how these brands are responding by extending their advertising reach to Hispanics. Although it is good practice to create ads that specifically speak to the Hispanic consumer, it’s also known that Hispanics are engaging with your General Market targeted tactics as well. Which raises the question—why not try and target both markets from the very start? If marketers start their campaign with synergistic ads that employ slight differences in order to better reach General Market consumers versus Hispanics, there is a better chance that Hispanic consumers will engage with multiple touch points and, thus, a greater chance for persuasion. Lesson to be learned: don’t wait until your brand begins to take a downturn before you target Hispanics. If you know that engaging Hispanics is something you’re eventually going to do, reach out to this particular consumer group from the start in order to avoid having to execute defensive tactics to reverse declining...

Read More
Save a Little – Lose a Lot: The Potential Pitfalls of Translated Ad Copy
Apr20

Save a Little – Lose a Lot: The Potential Pitfalls of Translated Ad Copy

As more brand managers come to the realization that the Hispanic consumer plays an important role in the current and future health of their brands, the struggle to find enough money within the advertising budget to succeed across targets has intensified. Over the past decade or more, most of the larger brands have carved out sufficient ad budgets to engage Hispanics with dedicated creative, and the debate is around whether to create separate campaigns or to work Hispanic-targeted messages into a more Total Market approach. But for smaller brands with more limited ad budgets, the temptation is to create a single campaign, and to simply translate the English-language ads into Spanish for targeted Hispanic media venues. Before going this lower cost route, advertisers need to consider the tradeoffs that are involved. Not only will Hispanic-targeted ads that are just translated versions of General Market ads not work as well, they can actually backfire on the brand. We know from our research that, with the exception of the least acculturated Hispanics, the majority of Hispanics who see your targeted ads also are exposed to your General Market targeted media. Engaging with the same ad in two different languages doesn’t further develop a message by building on the existing campaign, it simply increases viewing frequency for the ad. In contrast, by developing a new ad instead of translating an existing one, advertisers can create an execution that contains relevant tones and speaks directly to the Hispanic consumer. An ad crafted specifically for the Hispanic audience will be more engaging and will contribute to the intensity of the brand’s campaign. A consumer who has engaged with multiple touch points—the ads targeting General Market consumers and the ads specifically targeting Hispanics – is more persuaded than a consumer who just sees the same ad (albeit in two languages) multiple times. But more importantly, running translated General Market targeted ads may actually be worse than running no Spanish language ads at all. Consumers know that brands are trying to establish a personal connection with them through advertising, but also knowing that these brands didn’t take the time or effort to craft something designed to actually speak with them makes them feel like a lesser priority. As a Hispanic consumer, there is no compelling reason to build affinity with a brand that generalizes you and thinks that advertising crafted for a different audience will have the same effect on you if it’s simply in your language. By translating advertisements that were shaped for General Market consumers instead of creating a different execution specifically designed for the Hispanic audience, advertisers are missing out on a big...

Read More
Sprint Misses the Mark in Addressing the Hispanic Audience
Dec01

Sprint Misses the Mark in Addressing the Hispanic Audience

Shifting its advertising strategy, Sprint has moved from the ‘Framily’ campaign, to a new value family plan message for both Hispanic and General Market TV audiences. As reported in Ad Age, the company is positioning its Bolivian CEO Marcelo Claure as the “celebrity” of its Hispanic targeted TV spot, which made its debut during the Latin Grammys in late November. The spot features simulated news reels sharing Claure’s immigrant story and how, through hard work, sweat, and tears, he worked his way to the top as Sprint’s CEO. The spot then moves to Claure speaking directly to the consumer about his family’s mobile usage. According to Sprint’s Hispanic marketing manager, Kymber Umaña, the company is hoping the spot will resonate with the Hispanic community and create a personal connection. After watching the ad, I couldn’t help but question the effectiveness. Will this new execution accomplish Sprint’s goal and establish a connection with the Hispanic consumer? It is inspiring to see someone with similar heritage rise to the top in the corporate world, but is being Hispanic enough for the CEO to create and foster brand affinity with consumers? Perhaps it will, but I have my reservations. First and foremost, with a focus on Claure’s success story and his personal story on how he’s simplifying the convoluted world of cell phone providers, the ad feels more like the Sprint CEO is running for office, instead of trying to personally connect with the consumers. The script, featuring phrases like “family man” and “our family likes to stay connected using mobile phones,” sounds like Claure is reading an article on the mobile device behaviours of Hispanics. That said, it still fails to provide genuine evidence supporting any of these assertions. To compound the difficulty in persuading this target, the majority of Hispanics aren’t just watching Univisión and Telemundo; we spend much of our television viewing time on networks like ABC and NBC. As such, Hispanics are also engaging with the General Market commercial replacing “Framily:” the screaming goat, which pokes fun at other mobile companies. An accomplished Hispanic CEO, a screaming goat – where’s the connection? Even the tone and message of each campaign vary. If Sprint is trying to effectively advertise to Hispanics, then they need to have a consistent and clear message across all of their advertising, both English and Spanish. The concept of utilizing a company’s Hispanic CEO to relate to Hispanic consumers could be very effective, but most companies don’t have an inspirational Hispanic C-suite resident and need another option. Portraying ordinary Hispanics who are actual users and fans of the brand could resonate even more with Hispanic...

Read More
Page 1 of 212