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Hispanics’ View of Corporate Social Responsibility
Oct29

Hispanics’ View of Corporate Social Responsibility

In this exclusive piece, Aleena Astorga Roeschley, senior project manager and multicultural expert at Communicus, Inc., discusses Latinos’ perspectives on corporate philanthropy. Many brand marketers have developed corporate responsibility programs where they team up with consumers to help those in need–General Mills’ Box Tops for Education, for example, is one of the longest running and most visible initiatives. But while Hispanic consumers are generous and philanthropic by nature, it is worth questioning how well these type programs can engage them. Click HERE for...

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It’s a Color-Coded World
Jul16

It’s a Color-Coded World

Consumers have long been trained to associate certain colors with specific brands. Take rental cars: I’m confident if I show you the color red and ask you about a rental car brand, you’ll think of Avis, orange will make you think of Budget, gold will make you think of Hertz, and you’ll associate green with National. Similarly, in the telecommunications business, it’s as if representatives from AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile and Sprint sat around a table and divided the color wheel. Tiffany & Co. blue is unmistakable (and trademarked), UPS is synonymous with brown and John Deere associates with forest green. Such examples establish the brands’ identities with a clarity that is enviable as brands across sectors struggle to differentiate themselves. But does anybody care? After all, the fact that UPS is associated with brown doesn’t really say anything about the brand, does it? And what does red say about Avis or green about National? Being associated with a color is a hugely valuable asset for any brand. One of the biggest challenges for brand marketers is to generate instantaneous brand recognition whenever their target consumers encounter the brand, whether in advertising, in store or other via other touch points. Owning a color can prompt brand identification, allowing consumers to know how to find the product and instantly recognize it. DOWNLOAD AMA’S ARTICLE...

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Why the #1 Problem with Advertising is the Easiest to Fix
May07

Why the #1 Problem with Advertising is the Easiest to Fix

There are an infinite amount of variables that an advertiser can control to maximize the success of a marketing program. It starts with how to position the brand, which media to use and how to allocate the investment. The puzzle is getting even more complex with the emergence of programmatic buying, second screen opportunities, native advertising, social media vehicles, and all of the other trendy tools out there today. But if we step back from all of the trends and all of the intricacies of marketing, what it really comes down to is creative. This is what determines the effectiveness of a marketing campaign (yes, it’s even more important than the amount of money you have to spend). And the number one place where creative falls short is the simplest, but often forgotten task – assuring that those who see an advertisement link it back to the correct brand. That’s right – Brand Linkage is the #1 problem with advertising, and it’s the easiest to fix. Take television for example – 56% of those with proven awareness of a given TV commercial do not know what brand was being advertised. That’s over half of the earned audience members who are essentially wasted. The problem is even worse for media like promotions (67% of those aware don’t know the brand) and radio (78% of those aware don’t know the brand). And unfortunately, based on our research, there’s no subliminal advertising effects. Those who see your ad but don’t link it back to your brand demonstrate the same changes over time (in brand favorability) as those who do not see your ad at all. So how do you fix it? We provide some fundamental solutions in this article, this article and this white paper. Sometimes, it’s as simple as making Brand Linkage a priority in creative development and pre-testing. One of our clients was able to improve Brand Linkage for their portfolio of brands by over 200% over a 9 year period of working with Communicus, just by changing the way that the organization thinks about creative. Just think of all of the marketing dollars you could not be...

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Save a Little – Lose a Lot: The Potential Pitfalls of Translated Ad Copy
Apr20

Save a Little – Lose a Lot: The Potential Pitfalls of Translated Ad Copy

As more brand managers come to the realization that the Hispanic consumer plays an important role in the current and future health of their brands, the struggle to find enough money within the advertising budget to succeed across targets has intensified. Over the past decade or more, most of the larger brands have carved out sufficient ad budgets to engage Hispanics with dedicated creative, and the debate is around whether to create separate campaigns or to work Hispanic-targeted messages into a more Total Market approach. But for smaller brands with more limited ad budgets, the temptation is to create a single campaign, and to simply translate the English-language ads into Spanish for targeted Hispanic media venues. Before going this lower cost route, advertisers need to consider the tradeoffs that are involved. Not only will Hispanic-targeted ads that are just translated versions of General Market ads not work as well, they can actually backfire on the brand. We know from our research that, with the exception of the least acculturated Hispanics, the majority of Hispanics who see your targeted ads also are exposed to your General Market targeted media. Engaging with the same ad in two different languages doesn’t further develop a message by building on the existing campaign, it simply increases viewing frequency for the ad. In contrast, by developing a new ad instead of translating an existing one, advertisers can create an execution that contains relevant tones and speaks directly to the Hispanic consumer. An ad crafted specifically for the Hispanic audience will be more engaging and will contribute to the intensity of the brand’s campaign. A consumer who has engaged with multiple touch points—the ads targeting General Market consumers and the ads specifically targeting Hispanics – is more persuaded than a consumer who just sees the same ad (albeit in two languages) multiple times. But more importantly, running translated General Market targeted ads may actually be worse than running no Spanish language ads at all. Consumers know that brands are trying to establish a personal connection with them through advertising, but also knowing that these brands didn’t take the time or effort to craft something designed to actually speak with them makes them feel like a lesser priority. As a Hispanic consumer, there is no compelling reason to build affinity with a brand that generalizes you and thinks that advertising crafted for a different audience will have the same effect on you if it’s simply in your language. By translating advertisements that were shaped for General Market consumers instead of creating a different execution specifically designed for the Hispanic audience, advertisers are missing out on a big...

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Millennials and Brands
Apr15

Millennials and Brands

Many marketers are concerned about the death of the traditional brand. As the millennial generation (those classified as adults ages 18-34) start to exercise their purchasing power, there is a strong sense of foreboding. The media is full of reports of how millennials don’t pay attention to or believe traditional advertising. Store brands proliferate and consumers who switched from name brands to save money when their household budgets were tight don’t seem inclined to go back. What’s a brand marketer to think and, more importantly, what are they to do? Click HERE for...

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