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It’s a Color-Coded World
Jul16

It’s a Color-Coded World

Consumers have long been trained to associate certain colors with specific brands. Take rental cars: I’m confident if I show you the color red and ask you about a rental car brand, you’ll think of Avis, orange will make you think of Budget, gold will make you think of Hertz, and you’ll associate green with National. Similarly, in the telecommunications business, it’s as if representatives from AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile and Sprint sat around a table and divided the color wheel. Tiffany & Co. blue is unmistakable (and trademarked), UPS is synonymous with brown and John Deere associates with forest green. Such examples establish the brands’ identities with a clarity that is enviable as brands across sectors struggle to differentiate themselves. But does anybody care? After all, the fact that UPS is associated with brown doesn’t really say anything about the brand, does it? And what does red say about Avis or green about National? Being associated with a color is a hugely valuable asset for any brand. One of the biggest challenges for brand marketers is to generate instantaneous brand recognition whenever their target consumers encounter the brand, whether in advertising, in store or other via other touch points. Owning a color can prompt brand identification, allowing consumers to know how to find the product and instantly recognize it. DOWNLOAD AMA’S ARTICLE...

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Save a Little – Lose a Lot: The Potential Pitfalls of Translated Ad Copy
Apr20

Save a Little – Lose a Lot: The Potential Pitfalls of Translated Ad Copy

As more brand managers come to the realization that the Hispanic consumer plays an important role in the current and future health of their brands, the struggle to find enough money within the advertising budget to succeed across targets has intensified. Over the past decade or more, most of the larger brands have carved out sufficient ad budgets to engage Hispanics with dedicated creative, and the debate is around whether to create separate campaigns or to work Hispanic-targeted messages into a more Total Market approach. But for smaller brands with more limited ad budgets, the temptation is to create a single campaign, and to simply translate the English-language ads into Spanish for targeted Hispanic media venues. Before going this lower cost route, advertisers need to consider the tradeoffs that are involved. Not only will Hispanic-targeted ads that are just translated versions of General Market ads not work as well, they can actually backfire on the brand. We know from our research that, with the exception of the least acculturated Hispanics, the majority of Hispanics who see your targeted ads also are exposed to your General Market targeted media. Engaging with the same ad in two different languages doesn’t further develop a message by building on the existing campaign, it simply increases viewing frequency for the ad. In contrast, by developing a new ad instead of translating an existing one, advertisers can create an execution that contains relevant tones and speaks directly to the Hispanic consumer. An ad crafted specifically for the Hispanic audience will be more engaging and will contribute to the intensity of the brand’s campaign. A consumer who has engaged with multiple touch points—the ads targeting General Market consumers and the ads specifically targeting Hispanics – is more persuaded than a consumer who just sees the same ad (albeit in two languages) multiple times. But more importantly, running translated General Market targeted ads may actually be worse than running no Spanish language ads at all. Consumers know that brands are trying to establish a personal connection with them through advertising, but also knowing that these brands didn’t take the time or effort to craft something designed to actually speak with them makes them feel like a lesser priority. As a Hispanic consumer, there is no compelling reason to build affinity with a brand that generalizes you and thinks that advertising crafted for a different audience will have the same effect on you if it’s simply in your language. By translating advertisements that were shaped for General Market consumers instead of creating a different execution specifically designed for the Hispanic audience, advertisers are missing out on a big...

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How to Redefine Customer Loyalty With Churn Analysis
Apr01

How to Redefine Customer Loyalty With Churn Analysis

To brand marketers, fostering brand loyalty is a major objective. It’s a commonly held belief that the loyal customer is a brand’s greatest asset—worth far more than the brand switcher, both in terms of the premium prices that they will pay and the marketer’s ability to maintain a stable sales base. However, often marketers assume that an unchanging share of market implies stability in consumers’ brand purchasing habits. Click HERE for...

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Mapping the chain of influence on consumer choice
Mar05

Mapping the chain of influence on consumer choice

With billions of dollars being spent annually on advertising by major U.S. advertisers, there is no question that advertising plays a vital role in building brands and influencing consumer choice. While this principle is widely accepted, nearly every advertiser is charged with quantifying the specific return on investment that advertising and integrated marketing communications generates for brands in-market. Further, marketers are pushed to optimize campaigns to achieve specific future performance metrics. Retrospective or backward-looking advertising research approaches have long been the standard to understand how advertising works in-market and to provide insight into how to optimize future campaigns. Armed with post-campaign performance information and sales data, advertisers can determine the extent to which campaigns (and individual campaign elements) contributed (or failed to contribute) to sales outcomes. Click HERE for...

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The Risks and Rewards of Competitive Advertising
Mar05

The Risks and Rewards of Competitive Advertising

When one brand dominates a category, it’s not uncommon for the “wannabes” to take direct shots at the leader. In the mobile device wars, Samsung launched its “The Next Big Thing” ad, which negatively portrays Apple’s products in comparison to Samsung’s. But Samsung isn’t the only one attacking Apple. Microsoft has also jumped on the Apple-bashing bandwagon by featuring ads that pit Cortana, Microsoft’s audio-enabled smartphone interface, against Apple’s Siri. Click HERE for...

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