www.TrendsInAdvertising.com
Brought to you by Communicus
Super Bowl 50 Advertising Sells-Out at Record Nearly $5 Million for :30; What Can Advertisers Expect in Return?
Jan22

Super Bowl 50 Advertising Sells-Out at Record Nearly $5 Million for :30; What Can Advertisers Expect in Return?

Communicus has evaluated the effectiveness of over 150 Super Bowl commercials between 2011 and 2015. Advertisers who have invested the $5 million or more[…]

Read More
Super Bowl Frenzy, Part 50
Nov09

Super Bowl Frenzy, Part 50

It’s only early November, and CBS says that they’re almost sold out of ad inventory for Super Bowl 50, which will be held nearly 3 months from now, on February 7 of next year. What is it about this event that drives so many advertisers to line up to pay the going price of $5 million per :30 of commercial time, plus all of the production and PR costs that go along with the buy? It can’t be the numbers. On the basis of the conservatively estimated $10mm total investment, a typical CPG brand would have to sell 50 million additional units beyond what they would have sold without the commercial buy to recoup the investment. An auto company would have to sell over 7,000 additional cars which without that 30-second experience would have gone unsold to recover the cost of being on the Super Bowl. What’s more, we know the odds are stacked against this happening – while some commercials do better than others in breaking through and persuading, the average Super Bowl commercial achieves branded awareness among about 9.5 % of American adults, or 2.3 million consumers. Okay, that’s a pretty big number on the basis of a single exposure. However, the odds are only one in five that this one commercial exposure is going to actually convince a meaningful number of that 2.3 million consumers to do anything differently, in regards to the brand, than they otherwise would have. The math just doesn’t add up. But of course, each individual advertiser is convinced that this year, this spot is going to break out and win it all. And, in fact there are the winners. Some win big in a short-term way. Budweiser’s 2014 pairing of its iconic Clydesdales with a puppy, in the widely heralded Puppy Love execution, didn’t only generate strong awareness and buzz for the brand – Communicus data suggests that it also had a significant impact on building favorability for the beer itself. Some win big over a longer period. GoDaddy first started advertising on the Super Bowl in 2005, and for the next seven years was highly effective in using the venue to build awareness of the company and its products. However, the brand has been off its game recently, having stalled in 2013, 2014 and 2015 in its use of the Super Bowl buy to leverage its way into the consideration set of those who are in the market for domain names and websites. For some Super Bowl advertisers, the allure may be more about getting to have a really good time developing creative concepts that become high-budget, talked about TV...

Read More
Hispanics’ View of Corporate Social Responsibility
Oct29

Hispanics’ View of Corporate Social Responsibility

In this exclusive piece, Aleena Astorga Roeschley, senior project manager and multicultural expert at Communicus, Inc., discusses Latinos’ perspectives on corporate philanthropy. Many brand marketers have developed corporate responsibility programs where they team up with consumers to help those in need–General Mills’ Box Tops for Education, for example, is one of the longest running and most visible initiatives. But while Hispanic consumers are generous and philanthropic by nature, it is worth questioning how well these type programs can engage them. Click HERE for...

Read More
Connecting consumer preconceptions and advertising engagement
Oct02

Connecting consumer preconceptions and advertising engagement

Why is it that some individuals choose to engage with a particular ad while others ignore it all together? That’s the million-dollar question. Creators of advertisements strive to ensure that their ads secure the attention of the widest possible swath of consumers within their target audience. With that said, not all consumers are created equal when it comes to the likelihood of engaging with a specific ad for which they have exposure opportunity. Click HERE for...

Read More
Millennials and the New Marketing
Oct01

Millennials and the New Marketing

Consumers have long been vocal about their aversion toward ads; ads interrupt programs, push products that are potentially not of interest and are, in general, a nuisance. However, consumers do appreciate some aspects of advertising—ads are sometimes entertaining and occasionally provide information about products and services relevant to future purchase decisions. Recently, advancements in media and technology have provided advertisers with a multitude of new ways to target and connect with potential customers. One of the most significant changes involves increasingly precise methods for targeting ads to the appropriate consumer. Via “programmatic” buying, advertisers who once developed a single commercial intended to appeal to everyone can now run multiple ads, each addressing a specific type of consumer—as defined by demographics, lifestyle or past purchase behavior. Click HERE for...

Read More
Page 1 of 612345...Last »