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Connecting consumer preconceptions and advertising engagement
Oct02

Connecting consumer preconceptions and advertising engagement

Why is it that some individuals choose to engage with a particular ad while others ignore it all together? That’s the million-dollar question. Creators of advertisements strive to ensure that their ads secure the attention of the widest possible swath of consumers within their target audience. With that said, not all consumers are created equal when it comes to the likelihood of engaging with a specific ad for which they have exposure opportunity. Click HERE for...

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Screen Time
Sep29

Screen Time

Ever since the DVR was introduced in 1999, pundits have been telling us that the days of brands being able to advertise via the traditional TV commercial were soon to be gone. Since then, there have been a number of additional marketplace dynamics that have helped to reinforce this doom-and-gloom scenario. Interestingly, the traditional TV commercial is still around today, with U.S. marketers spending nearly $80 billion per year on TV advertising. In fact, Nielsen and others have confirmed that while hours spent on the Internet have increased, TV continues to comprise the lion’s share of our entertainment consumption, and data on advertising effectiveness from a wide range of sources confirms that TV commercials contribute far more to the overall advertising awareness and impact for a typical consumer-targeted campaign than do all other media venues and creative elements combined. At the same time, changes in consumer behavior over the past few years cannot be discounted. Click HERE for...

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Delicate dance: Targeting biculturals
Sep29

Delicate dance: Targeting biculturals

Advertisers often alienate first- and second-generation Hispanics When we say the word Hispanics, we’re lumping a large, diverse range of people into one very narrow group. Though Hispanics do share a common ethnicity, their experiences and history are quite different, and understanding that is a key part of putting together an effective media plan to reach them. One growing subgroup of Hispanics in the U.S. is bicultural Hispanics, first- or second-generation citizens who grew up in this country. Many are also Millennials, and they toggle easily between cultures and languages. Connecting with this group can be challenging for advertisers. They are easily alienated by anything that appears inauthentic or pandering. They appreciate advertising that speaks directly to them and doesn’t just have a Spanish voiceover slapped on. Aleena Astorga Roeschley, research director and multicultural expert at Communicus, an advertising consultancy, talks to Media Life about defining bicultural Hispanics, targeting them more effectively, and how to mimic previous campaigns that have worked. Read Media Life Magazine’s: Delicate dance: Targeting...

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Myths And Realities: Advertising That Engages And Persuades Hispanic Targets
Sep28

Myths And Realities: Advertising That Engages And Persuades Hispanic Targets

There is a variety of strategies on how to best advertise to Hispanic targets. While some tactics can be effective, many are built on myths that no longer particularly work. It’s easy to stereotype an audience, and then address them as such. But the 55 million individual Hispanic consumers in the U.S. are definitely not monolithic, nor should they be stereotyped. When advertising is created based on commonly held beliefs about what works, it often results in creative that fails to break through and persuade. Many Hispanic campaigns are built based on the following. Click HERE for...

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Will Your New Creative Approach Succeed In-Market?
Sep24

Will Your New Creative Approach Succeed In-Market?

A recent article in Ad Age discussed an issue that we’ve been hearing a lot of clients talking about lately – the problems with old copy testing methods in a changing world. The topic of copy testing has always been polarizing. One camp firmly believes in copy testing’s ability to pick the winners, provide actionable diagnostic feedback and thus mitigate risk and ensure advertising that works in-market. The other camp has always firmly believed that copy testing isn’t actually very successful at predicting winners, instead rewarding formulaic advertising and stifling creativity. Dramatic shifts in the world of advertising have created even more pressures on copy testing, with advertisers needing more rapid feedback in a fast-moving world, and the expansion of online branded content requiring ever more copy be produced, including copy that is highly customized for specific audience segments. Many campaigns that have been copy tested fail to produce in-market success, lending credence to the argument that copy testing doesn’t work all that well. (Of course, this begs the question of how much worse the overall advertising environment might be if copy testing didn’t exist…) On the other hand, there are countless non-tested approaches that crash and burn (or fizzle and die) when they hit the market, suggesting that not all brave anti-copy testing senior executives are all that prescient either. It would be great if all advertising decision makers had the intuition and foresight to identify the potential power of ‘Just Do It’ – to name just one of the countless, non-copy tested classics. This individual also needs to be able to identify with certainty those ideas that look good on paper but will fail to connect – either because they are actually small, non-breakthrough ideas or are clever but don’t speak effectively to the hearts and minds of the target audience. But, unfortunately, the kind of advertising wisdom and judgement that can make those calls – not to mention the senior management culture that’s okay with a no-copy testing scenario – isn’t found in many companies. I would suggest that the odds of launching a successful new campaign – or even of producing strong executions within an existing campaign – can be improved dramatically by advertisers who take a more disciplined approach to examining and learning from past in-market results – both successes and failures. Examining actual marketing results in an in-depth manner, and documenting the foundational learning that results, can lead to both dramatic and incremental improvements that are, in fact, highly predictive of both short term and long term advertising success. No, I’m not talking about simply re-executing what’s worked in the past. To the...

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