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Are Parents Too Busy to Notice Your Ads? Or Actively Solution-Seeking?
Jan15

Are Parents Too Busy to Notice Your Ads? Or Actively Solution-Seeking?

Parents are time-constrained, cash-strapped and trying-to-do-it-all, and are one of the most highly sought after group by a variety of brands. Brands ranging from diapers to food products to cars to financial institutions, target parents with family-filled advertising images and benefit propositions aimed at making their life just a little easier. With all the demands facing parents today, do they really even notice? Surprisingly, Communicus has consistently found that parents are just as likely as other consumers to take note of advertising – including TV, digital and print ads. Between soccer games, late night feedings and other demands of family life, parents are noticing advertising at the same rates as non-parents. However, parents are significantly more likely than their non-parent counterparts to notice FSI and point-of-sale efforts. These platforms, which often provide monetary incentives and/or solutions for everyday concerns –like what to make for dinner tonight – are particularly effective in reaching parents. Simply getting parents to engage with ads is merely the first step towards driving purchase intent – they must also register the brand. The good news for advertisers is that parents are actually significantly more likely to recall the brand being advertised across mediums (TV, digital, print, FSI and POS) than are non-parents. While the differences are strongest for FSI and POS elements with which they are highly engaged, correct brand linkage tends to be 20-30% higher across other mediums as well. What might explain these differences in engagement and brand linkage across consumer targets, you ask? It appears that despite being busy and having significant demands on their attention, parents are looking to brands and products to provide solutions, inspiration and to help them be better parents. This intersection of consumers hungry for brand-driven solutions who also yield substantial purchasing power poses great opportunities for brand marketers. To capitalize on these dynamics there are a few simple things advertisers can do to successfully reach and persuade parents: Leverage FSI/POS elements widely and ensure they are creatively tied to other campaign elements so that they function as both an immediate incentive to purchase and also remind the consumer of the brand’s key benefits. In this way, they can help to fulfill both short and long-term brand building goals. Make it easy for parents by providing them with solution and/or inspiration driven messages rooted in your brand’s key point-of-difference. Find them in multiple places – parents are looking for solutions across mediums so having a robust multi-media approach is key in generating both strong engagement and in generating the strong branding dynamics that will further your brand’s objectives. Are parents a key target for your brand? If...

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For Super Bowl Advertisers, Loud Bark Doesn’t Equal Big Bite
Jan13

For Super Bowl Advertisers, Loud Bark Doesn’t Equal Big Bite

Small dogs can bark, and that certainly holds true for Super Bowl advertisers. But Communicus, a Tucson, Ariz.-based ad consultancy, says that big or small, the volume isn’t the point when it comes to successful Super Bowl ads. The company says that 80% of ads fail to produce meaningful impact among consumers, though small and “underdog” brands often beat those odds. Especially those brands offering something really new. The firm points to Beats Headphones, Sonos Wireless Hi-Fi and Butterfinger Peanut Butter Cups as standouts last year. Yes, there are small dogs who yap incessantly, but the irritation factor doesn’t count. Click HERE for...

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Mobile-reliant Hispanic market could be a key for Apple Competitors [INSIGHT]
Nov13

Mobile-reliant Hispanic market could be a key for Apple Competitors [INSIGHT]

Communicus has revealed Hispanic-specific findings from their research into how parents and children engage with and purchase mobile devices. Key findings from Communicus’ research include: · Hispanic children are 70% more likely than general market children to own a tablet. Hispanic pre-kindergarten aged youth are 45% more likely to ask their parents for a tablet. · Half of Hispanic parents are considering purchasing Samsung, Google, or other non-Apple iPad tablets for themselves. Hispanic parents are five times more likely to own an Amazon Fire Phone compared to general market parents, and more than twice as likely to own a Microsoft tablet. Click HERE for...

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Assessing Brand Relevance: A True View
Apr15

Assessing Brand Relevance: A True View

Most major brands and advertisers have systems in place to track and quantify brand health. While the inputs and sophistication of these systems vary, there are several aspects of brand health that nearly everyone can agree are important, including: salience, differentiation, relevance, and loyalty. Several of these dimensions are appropriate for evaluation via survey research with supportive data coming from qualitative research and panel data. However, truly understanding brand relevance can be a difficult task. When asked what makes brands relevant, consumers often default to listing category-level drivers such as ‘great taste’ for food brands or ‘high quality’ for durable goods. It can be difficult for consumers to articulate why they intrinsically relate to a brand. Thus, a more robust approach is needed to truly understand what makes your brand relevant and the ever changing dynamics that underlie this. One of the most powerful tools in understanding brand relevance is the use of predictive analytics to uncover relationships between brand perceptions and purchasing behavior. By using a holistic suite of analytics, you can develop a robust picture of consumer motivations. The use of multiple models allows you to understand three key relationships: The relationships between various brand attributes The relationship between brand perceptions and future purchase intentions/brand loyalty The relationship between brand perceptions and a sale. This multi-faceted approach will give you a strong understanding of what makes your brand relevant to your target consumers today. Developing a robust point-in-time approach is an important first step in understanding brand relevance, but understanding how marketplace influences are continually affecting your brand’s relevance is equally important. There are a number of forces that can change the perceived relevance of your brand: your advertising or integrated marketing campaign, competitive campaigns, new product entries in your category and the emergence of new categories, to name a few. Thus, utilizing research that captures the dynamism of relevance is important to gaining a complete understanding of brand health. If you don’t have a complete picture of the marketplace forces impacting this dimension, you don’t have a complete and actionable sense of your brand’s health. While brand relevance is one of many important aspects of brand health, it is a dimension that is worth an investment in robust analytics to monitor and track. You need to know if any looming forces or changes in messages are threatening to move you closer to...

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Amazon’s Ads: What’s In It for Brands?
Mar24

Amazon’s Ads: What’s In It for Brands?

Amazon is on target to sell close to $1 billion worth of advertising this year. Using data from 237 million active customers, Amazon is quickly generating more ad revenue than other online advertising platforms. What is setting the online retail giant apart from competitive platforms like Google, Pandora, and Twitter? The power of purchase. The data that Amazon collects enables the company to see patterns that Google and other rivals could never find. Unlike Google, Amazon captures not only what consumers search for, but also what they buy. With that insight, Amazon can connect the dots between consumer purchases to identify both the products a shopper is looking for and the consistency or repetition of purchase. Additionally, it’s easier to appeal to consumers when they are very ready to buy – as Amazon’s platform allows. With such a strong upper hand, why isn’t Amazon already monopolizing the ad business? The company has been holding off on sharing their coveted consumer data – and will most likely continue to keep it protected to avoid alienating their customers. This has stunted Amazon’s growth in the ad-selling business, but they still made $70.5 billion last year on merchandise. The pressure of transforming into a top ad business isn’t as intense when you’re making money through other channels, and could face concerns with potentially alienating shoppers over privacy matters. Amazon has still been experimenting with ad platforms, searching for advertising strategies that won’t turn away customers. While protecting customer data, Amazon plans to categorize shoppers under headings like “Fashionista” or “Gadget Geek” depending on their purchases. This will create thematic advertising messages, without giving away specific details. The opportunities for Amazon to advertise extend far beyond their website. The company has been developing ads for services such as Amazon Prime Instant Video and Kindle devices (customers get a subsidized rate for devices with ads, and pay more for those without them). These video ads are not jockeying for immediate purchase on the site, but brands like Nissan and Geico are fans of the experimenting they’ve done to this point. These companies, like other advertisers, are constantly on the lookout for new venues that will get their branded content in front of consumers. The advertising opportunity could produce strong results if Amazon provides either better targeting opportunities or the chance to reach otherwise difficult to reach consumers. If advertisers continue to see success on the mega-online retailer’s platforms, the nearly $6 billion expected in US video ads sales, will have a significantly greater portion captured by Amazon. For advertisers waiting for Amazon to begin to disclose their  precious behavioral data, your wait may not...

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