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Screen Time
Sep29

Screen Time

Ever since the DVR was introduced in 1999, pundits have been telling us that the days of brands being able to advertise via the traditional TV commercial were soon to be gone. Since then, there have been a number of additional marketplace dynamics that have helped to reinforce this doom-and-gloom scenario. Interestingly, the traditional TV commercial is still around today, with U.S. marketers spending nearly $80 billion per year on TV advertising. In fact, Nielsen and others have confirmed that while hours spent on the Internet have increased, TV continues to comprise the lion’s share of our entertainment consumption, and data on advertising effectiveness from a wide range of sources confirms that TV commercials contribute far more to the overall advertising awareness and impact for a typical consumer-targeted campaign than do all other media venues and creative elements combined. At the same time, changes in consumer behavior over the past few years cannot be discounted. Click HERE for...

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The ‘Terrible Teen’ Years of Digital Advertising
Dec31

The ‘Terrible Teen’ Years of Digital Advertising

If digital advertising is the golden child of modern marketing, it is currently going through that terrible, unruly teenage phase. The industry’s love affair with digital is not going away – according to Magna Global “ad revenue from digital media grew 17% to $142 billion this year…and it’s on track to surpass TV revenue in the U.S. by 2017”. At the same time, the online media environment has become one of the most difficult environments for advertising to succeed. Google recently released a report finding that 56% of digital ads are never seen. And being ‘seen’ means that at least 50% of the ad was visible on-screen for at least a second. Yes, one second. The Interactive Advertising Bureau says that 100% viewability of digital ads is ‘not yet possible,’ so we shouldn’t expect this to get better any time soon. Once an ad is ‘viewable,’ it faces even bigger hurdles of earning the attention of the website visitor. Keep in mind, the website visitor is likely on the site for a very specific reason, and any ads on screen are simply an unwanted distraction from achieving their objective. When you add the clutter of other ‘distractions’ online, the ability of an ad to be both viewable and noticed seems like a nearly impossible feat. This is where the power of creative, and the importance of a high quality media buy, comes in. Media buys which prioritize high quality and relevant viewing environments over a sheer number of impressions can boost the chances of success for an ad. But media is less than half of the story – breakthrough creative is the real key to being noticed. When it comes to producing the creative, many marketers are tempted to play with all the fun toys available with digital advertising. But in fact, using complex animation, telling a story, or building in consumer-involvement games only amplifies the distractions. Considering the highly cluttered environment, distracted audience, and minimal ‘viewable’ time on-screen, the ads that get noticed tend to be those that are simple, even ‘billboard-like’ – so no matter when it happens to catch the viewer’s eye, they immediately get it (both the brand and the message, if any). For more tips on optimizing your investment in digital advertising, see our White...

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Optimizing Your TV Investment With More Executions
Oct30

Optimizing Your TV Investment With More Executions

How far will your advertising dollars go? Advertisers are trying to make the most of their budgets by minimizing the investment in ‘non-working’ dollars – readjusting investments to produce just one TV spot in place of a pool of executions. The popular idea that more media exposures translates to better returns isn’t necessarily the case. In fact, reworking your ad budget to produce multiple spots can pay off in greater campaign effectiveness and ROI. Why is more better when it comes to the number of ad executions your consumer is exposed to? The three primary reasons are explained in detail in our Knowledge Center. See more in the Communicus Knowledge...

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The Mobile Device Path to Purchase: Parents & Children
Oct10

The Mobile Device Path to Purchase: Parents & Children

New Communicus research sheds light on kids and mobile devices. According to the study, one-third of American pre-kindergarten-age children have their own tablet, while two-thirds of kids regularly use tablets. Among those that do not have tablets, 50% ask their parents to buy them one. Children who already have a mobile device are as likely (or more likely) to ask for a new device, as are those without one. More kids want iPads or iPhones than any other mobile device, and beyond Apple devices, most young users do not care what brand they get. Advertisers who hope to gain market share for their mobile devices over the coming months (and years) would be wise to recognize young consumers and their power to persuade. A thorough exploration of the study is available in our Knowledge Center. See more in the Communicus Knowledge...

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YouTube Personalities Earn Celebrity Status Amongst Gen Z
Sep16

YouTube Personalities Earn Celebrity Status Amongst Gen Z

Want to impress teens and get them to buy your brand? New research conducted by Variety suggests that hiring a YouTube star to be your brand spokesperson could be the winning ticket. According to Variety’s recent survey, the top five celebrities with the strongest potential to persuade teens ages 13 to 18 are all YouTube stars. Number one is the comedy duo Smosh, followed by the Fine Bros. comedy team and video game commentator PewDiePie. According to the teens included in the survey, YouTube sensations win over more traditional Hollywood celebrities because of their authenticity and approachability. Variety research indicates that these two factors are closely related to the ability to persuade, a crucial factor for brand advertisers. Advertisers often look to celebrity endorsers to build their brands. In last year’s array of Super Bowl commercials, no fewer than 40% of the spots involved the use of at least one celebrity. In fact, Radio Shack, Dannon, and Bud Light were among some of the advertisers that managed to squeeze at least three well-known stars in a single 30-second spot. Some of the celebrity investments paid off and some didn’t – indicating, once again, that there is no formula that guarantees the success of advertising. But with the rising teen target and this new breed of celebrity, the challenges may be even greater. If you buy the idea that teens really are different and less likely to believe traditional sources of information, you probably won’t insert a YouTube star into a traditional video commercial format. A better fit might be an online, un-traditional communications promotion that is more conducive to the personality of the star. Given the fragmented nature of the online audience, it will be a challenge to gain the critical mass of exposures needed to move the needle for your brand. However, the potential breakthrough and persuasive star power of this latest celebrity niche may be the spark your brand needs to start building awareness and generating brand loyalty among the teen...

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