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Delicate dance: Targeting biculturals
Sep29

Delicate dance: Targeting biculturals

Advertisers often alienate first- and second-generation Hispanics When we say the word Hispanics, we’re lumping a large, diverse range of people into one very narrow group. Though Hispanics do share a common ethnicity, their experiences and history are quite different, and understanding that is a key part of putting together an effective media plan to reach them. One growing subgroup of Hispanics in the U.S. is bicultural Hispanics, first- or second-generation citizens who grew up in this country. Many are also Millennials, and they toggle easily between cultures and languages. Connecting with this group can be challenging for advertisers. They are easily alienated by anything that appears inauthentic or pandering. They appreciate advertising that speaks directly to them and doesn’t just have a Spanish voiceover slapped on. Aleena Astorga Roeschley, research director and multicultural expert at Communicus, an advertising consultancy, talks to Media Life about defining bicultural Hispanics, targeting them more effectively, and how to mimic previous campaigns that have worked. Read Media Life Magazine’s: Delicate dance: Targeting...

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It’s a Color-Coded World
Jul16

It’s a Color-Coded World

Consumers have long been trained to associate certain colors with specific brands. Take rental cars: I’m confident if I show you the color red and ask you about a rental car brand, you’ll think of Avis, orange will make you think of Budget, gold will make you think of Hertz, and you’ll associate green with National. Similarly, in the telecommunications business, it’s as if representatives from AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile and Sprint sat around a table and divided the color wheel. Tiffany & Co. blue is unmistakable (and trademarked), UPS is synonymous with brown and John Deere associates with forest green. Such examples establish the brands’ identities with a clarity that is enviable as brands across sectors struggle to differentiate themselves. But does anybody care? After all, the fact that UPS is associated with brown doesn’t really say anything about the brand, does it? And what does red say about Avis or green about National? Being associated with a color is a hugely valuable asset for any brand. One of the biggest challenges for brand marketers is to generate instantaneous brand recognition whenever their target consumers encounter the brand, whether in advertising, in store or other via other touch points. Owning a color can prompt brand identification, allowing consumers to know how to find the product and instantly recognize it. DOWNLOAD AMA’S ARTICLE...

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State Farm Makes Plans to Sell Car Insurance Customer Data
Jul15

State Farm Makes Plans to Sell Car Insurance Customer Data

State Farm has developed plans to sell customer data, allowing advertisers to create highly targeted pitches based on where, when and how people drive. In a patent application filed with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, State Farm proposes gathering information about drivers’ routes and stops from vehicles’ sensors, navigation systems, cameras or other devices. State Farm would send data on driver’s habits to “another unit or entity,” such as an advertising agency or vendor, and the agency would use this data to send the driver targeted radio or email ads. As the application explains, drivers might receive an ad for “Restaurant A” if they regularly visit similar restaurants. Click HERE for...

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Why the #1 Problem with Advertising is the Easiest to Fix
May07

Why the #1 Problem with Advertising is the Easiest to Fix

There are an infinite amount of variables that an advertiser can control to maximize the success of a marketing program. It starts with how to position the brand, which media to use and how to allocate the investment. The puzzle is getting even more complex with the emergence of programmatic buying, second screen opportunities, native advertising, social media vehicles, and all of the other trendy tools out there today. But if we step back from all of the trends and all of the intricacies of marketing, what it really comes down to is creative. This is what determines the effectiveness of a marketing campaign (yes, it’s even more important than the amount of money you have to spend). And the number one place where creative falls short is the simplest, but often forgotten task – assuring that those who see an advertisement link it back to the correct brand. That’s right – Brand Linkage is the #1 problem with advertising, and it’s the easiest to fix. Take television for example – 56% of those with proven awareness of a given TV commercial do not know what brand was being advertised. That’s over half of the earned audience members who are essentially wasted. The problem is even worse for media like promotions (67% of those aware don’t know the brand) and radio (78% of those aware don’t know the brand). And unfortunately, based on our research, there’s no subliminal advertising effects. Those who see your ad but don’t link it back to your brand demonstrate the same changes over time (in brand favorability) as those who do not see your ad at all. So how do you fix it? We provide some fundamental solutions in this article, this article and this white paper. Sometimes, it’s as simple as making Brand Linkage a priority in creative development and pre-testing. One of our clients was able to improve Brand Linkage for their portfolio of brands by over 200% over a 9 year period of working with Communicus, just by changing the way that the organization thinks about creative. Just think of all of the marketing dollars you could not be...

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Millennials and Brands
Apr15

Millennials and Brands

Many marketers are concerned about the death of the traditional brand. As the millennial generation (those classified as adults ages 18-34) start to exercise their purchasing power, there is a strong sense of foreboding. The media is full of reports of how millennials don’t pay attention to or believe traditional advertising. Store brands proliferate and consumers who switched from name brands to save money when their household budgets were tight don’t seem inclined to go back. What’s a brand marketer to think and, more importantly, what are they to do? Click HERE for...

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