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Super Bowl 50 Advertising Sells-Out at Record Nearly $5 Million for :30; What Can Advertisers Expect in Return?
Jan22

Super Bowl 50 Advertising Sells-Out at Record Nearly $5 Million for :30; What Can Advertisers Expect in Return?

Communicus has evaluated the effectiveness of over 150 Super Bowl commercials between 2011 and 2015. Advertisers who have invested the $5 million or more[…]

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Copy Testing Without Accountability
Oct22

Copy Testing Without Accountability

Most advertisers would love to know in advance whether the new ads in which they invest so much were going to actually work in-market. So they copy test, often testing several different concepts, selecting a winner, and then fine-tuning on the basis of the diagnostic feedback they gain. But how well does copy testing work? Two of the larger copy testing systems have been developed and refined – reverse engineered, really – on the basis of those companies’ in-market measurement systems. For reasons discussed below, there is a fairly wide margin of error in the predictive accuracy of these systems, but advertisers who use them do at least improve their odds of success. Then there is the rest of copy testing – the non-accountable systems. Copy tests that claim to predict how well the ad is going to work in-market (either via traditional survey designs or biometric measurement) but have no in-market feedback loop cannot provide any degree of confidence in their predictions. If you keep testing ads, keep deciding which are the winners based on getting better scores on your metrics, but haven’t validated and refined your algorithms, how can a client be sure that your system works? The ‘diagnostics’ that are provided by these non-accountable copy testing systems are equally suspect. The supplier can tell you with a high degree of confidence how to make the ad better. But if better means it’ll score higher in their system, and scoring higher in their system has no apparent correlation with in-market success, you’re refining to the copy test, not to the real world. Based in part on the frustration with traditional copy testing, another new category of diagnostic systems has emerged. Because we know that advertising often works most powerfully on an emotional level, advertisers have been experimenting with brain wave analyses, facial expression tracking and other means of observing how ads make people feel. Some have found this feedback to be of value as they seek to improve their ads’ ability to connect and persuade. These emotion-based measurement systems are, however, a long way from providing predictions of in-market performance, with most not even attempting to build quantitative links with actual in-market performance. But even the copy testing systems that do have the feedback/refinement loop struggle mightily to provide reliable predictions. You’d think it wouldn’t be so hard – Will this ad engage? Will the brand be remembered? Will it persuade? Copy testing fails in large part because it does not acknowledge that the world has changed. First, people don’t watch TV the way they used to – there’s less family around the TV all watching together,...

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Millennials and the New Marketing
Oct01

Millennials and the New Marketing

Consumers have long been vocal about their aversion toward ads; ads interrupt programs, push products that are potentially not of interest and are, in general, a nuisance. However, consumers do appreciate some aspects of advertising—ads are sometimes entertaining and occasionally provide information about products and services relevant to future purchase decisions. Recently, advancements in media and technology have provided advertisers with a multitude of new ways to target and connect with potential customers. One of the most significant changes involves increasingly precise methods for targeting ads to the appropriate consumer. Via “programmatic” buying, advertisers who once developed a single commercial intended to appeal to everyone can now run multiple ads, each addressing a specific type of consumer—as defined by demographics, lifestyle or past purchase behavior. Click HERE for...

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Myths And Realities: Advertising That Engages And Persuades Hispanic Targets
Sep28

Myths And Realities: Advertising That Engages And Persuades Hispanic Targets

There is a variety of strategies on how to best advertise to Hispanic targets. While some tactics can be effective, many are built on myths that no longer particularly work. It’s easy to stereotype an audience, and then address them as such. But the 55 million individual Hispanic consumers in the U.S. are definitely not monolithic, nor should they be stereotyped. When advertising is created based on commonly held beliefs about what works, it often results in creative that fails to break through and persuade. Many Hispanic campaigns are built based on the following. Click HERE for...

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State Farm Makes Plans to Sell Car Insurance Customer Data
Jul15

State Farm Makes Plans to Sell Car Insurance Customer Data

State Farm has developed plans to sell customer data, allowing advertisers to create highly targeted pitches based on where, when and how people drive. In a patent application filed with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, State Farm proposes gathering information about drivers’ routes and stops from vehicles’ sensors, navigation systems, cameras or other devices. State Farm would send data on driver’s habits to “another unit or entity,” such as an advertising agency or vendor, and the agency would use this data to send the driver targeted radio or email ads. As the application explains, drivers might receive an ad for “Restaurant A” if they regularly visit similar restaurants. Click HERE for...

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