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Survey explores how the “pester power” of children drives retail sales
Dec19

Survey explores how the “pester power” of children drives retail sales

Advertising consultancy Communicus says it has found that “child pestering” is one of the top predictors of a parent’s purchase intentions to buy a wireless device for their children. Its study, “The Mobile Device Path to Purchase: Parents & Children” found that for Apple, “child pestering” is the top predictor, being twice as important as social media, while for Samsung, it was the second predictor (first was positive word-of-mouth, by about 15 percent) in driving parental purchase intent. Click HERE for...

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Surprise, Social Media Changes Behavior
Aug22

Surprise, Social Media Changes Behavior

Jeri Smith talks to Media Life about how brands can persuade, whether TV commercials are persuasive as well, and how TV and the web can best work together for advertising. Read Media Life Magazine’s: Surprise, Social Media Changes...

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How Even ‘Small’ Media Investments Can Generate Big Results
Jul18

How Even ‘Small’ Media Investments Can Generate Big Results

Over the July 4th weekend, Coca-Cola orchestrated a strong digital push to support its sponsorship of the Coke Zero 400. Coca-Cola hosted page takeovers on Yahoo and NASCAR’s sites, launched a microsite where consumers could customize virtual products, and ran both flash banners and rich media while using pre-roll, mobile, and social platforms. The brand is hoping that this push helped support its ongoing ‘Share a Coke’ summer campaign. Despite the increased industry focus of the benefits with digital advertising, digital ads typically fail to generate the reach of more traditional broad based mediums such as TV and print. But from an overarching campaign perspective, Coca-Cola made a smart move with its digital investment. Communicus data shows that while digital and social efforts tend to generate limited awareness in isolation, these media often play a critical role in driving synergistic amplification effects, from a persuasion standpoint, across the broad campaign. While digital executions in isolation can show an effect, digital often plays a key role in boosting the impact of more broad-based campaign media such as TV and print. Thus, seeing one or two media in conjunction with digital generates more impact than the sum of the parts – a 1+1=3 effect. Coca-Cola has clearly allocated substantial financial resources to this digital effort, hoping for strong reach. But what about brands without deep pockets? Can a limited digital, social, or PR budget generate amplification effects for a brand if it doesn’t have the type of budget Coca-Cola does? The answer is: YES! Even a modest investment ($500k) into digital efforts can begin to generate campaign amplification effects. The same is true from a social media or public relations perspective: The reach doesn’t have to be exceptionally great to jump-start the cross-media synergies and strengthening effects. The challenge is to ensure that the creative is well integrated across media and sub-campaigns. The common threads tying the work together are more critical than the amount of investment in driving amplification effects. In the case of Coke, the brand ties its sponsorship and support of the Coke Zero 400 with the ‘Share a Coke’ effort via the virtual product customization and options to share content on various social media outlets; thus maximizing the opportunity for cross-media amplification to occur. Understanding the amplification effects that your supportive media generates can help advertisers more strategically allocate their spend across supportive media. Quantification of cross-media extensions can also help marketers resist the urge to throw all of the advertising dollars into a single medium when budgets are limited. These amplification effects make a multi-media campaign, even with limited dollars, more likely to generate a strong ROI...

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Is Social Media Killing Your Brand?
May30

Is Social Media Killing Your Brand?

Advertisers have always struggled to find ways to set their brands apart from the competition. Read Jeri Smith’s byline about the reduction in differentiation between major brands and their ongoing battle with private labels… Read...

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What Marketers Can Learn from the Oscars’ Best Advertising
Mar06

What Marketers Can Learn from the Oscars’ Best Advertising

Stars were in the spotlight this past Sunday at the Oscars celebration, but they weren’t the only ones who walked away with attention. Brands played a significant role during the evening’s festivities – not only to those seated in the Kodak Theatre, but to the viewers at home, all 43.7 million of them. The interactive show included scratch-off lottery tickets, pizza deliveries, and selfies – lots of selfies. Major advertising campaigns from Samsung and Pepsi hoped to earn significant recognition during the broadcast. One thing is certain: The efforts generated an onslaught of social media chatter. Post-show, Samsung has been by far the most talked about advertiser – but not for all the right reasons. The company paid for product placements throughout the duration of the show and gave ABC its smartphones to incorporate into the broadcast. Product placement has been used in broadcasting and film for years, but host Ellen DeGeneres and social media savvy viewers took things to the next level. Using a Samsung Galaxy s5, DeGeneres and friends managed to shut down Twitter by orchestrating a remarkable group selfie. The tweet took Twitter down and broke a record for retweets, currently totaling more than 3.3 million. “Samsung Galaxy” was one of the top tweeted phrases throughout the evening and afterward, even without a mention in the original upload. But this is a case where going by the numbers alone could be deceiving. Much of the focus on Samsung was for the fact that, after the paid selfie had gone out, host DeGeneres immediately returned to tweeting backstage from her iPhone. Samsung was subjected to a wave of ridicule, not just on Twitter and blogs, but from major media outlets as well. This attention did not necessarily build brand affinity or increase consumers’ likelihood to purchase the product. Meanwhile, Pepsi created a “Mini Hollywood” ad to introduce its new product, the Mini Pepsi. Our research of Super Bowl advertising has revealed that new product launches can garner a lot of attention during a live broadcasted event, if executed correctly.  Pepsi’s ad peaked at 1,200 tweet mentions per minute at one point during the evening, the highest total of the night The Oscars proved to be an excellent venue to drive social chatter and as our research has shown, engaging consumers in social conversations can be effective at building brand affinity and generating actual purchasing – when it is consistent with brand truths. Striking that balance of captivating audiences while also conveying the right message about your brand is key to maximizing ROI on advertising – whether for live events or any other...

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