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Are Super Bowl Ads a Waste of Money and Talent?
Jan29

Are Super Bowl Ads a Waste of Money and Talent?

Advertisers are expected to spend quarter of a billion dollars on Super Bowl ads, and they may not be worth the talent and money it takes to make them.

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Super Bowl 50 Advertising Sells-Out at Record Nearly $5 Million for :30; What Can Advertisers Expect in Return?
Jan22

Super Bowl 50 Advertising Sells-Out at Record Nearly $5 Million for :30; What Can Advertisers Expect in Return?

Communicus has evaluated the effectiveness of over 150 Super Bowl commercials between 2011 and 2015. Advertisers who have invested the $5 million or more[…]

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Super Bowl Advertising Success
Jan06

Super Bowl Advertising Success

In this piece, Jeri Smith, Chief Executive Officer at Communicus, Inc., discusses strategies for 2016 Super Bowl advertising success. All the hype aside: How do Super Bowl ads fare in persuading viewers to consider buying the advertised brand? Based on research that analyzed the impact of over 150 Super Bowl commercials between 2011 and 2015, here are the five strategies that are most likely to lead to success for 2016 Super Bowl advertisers who strive to build their brands. Click HERE for...

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Super Bowl Frenzy, Part 50
Nov09

Super Bowl Frenzy, Part 50

It’s only early November, and CBS says that they’re almost sold out of ad inventory for Super Bowl 50, which will be held nearly 3 months from now, on February 7 of next year. What is it about this event that drives so many advertisers to line up to pay the going price of $5 million per :30 of commercial time, plus all of the production and PR costs that go along with the buy? It can’t be the numbers. On the basis of the conservatively estimated $10mm total investment, a typical CPG brand would have to sell 50 million additional units beyond what they would have sold without the commercial buy to recoup the investment. An auto company would have to sell over 7,000 additional cars which without that 30-second experience would have gone unsold to recover the cost of being on the Super Bowl. What’s more, we know the odds are stacked against this happening – while some commercials do better than others in breaking through and persuading, the average Super Bowl commercial achieves branded awareness among about 9.5 % of American adults, or 2.3 million consumers. Okay, that’s a pretty big number on the basis of a single exposure. However, the odds are only one in five that this one commercial exposure is going to actually convince a meaningful number of that 2.3 million consumers to do anything differently, in regards to the brand, than they otherwise would have. The math just doesn’t add up. But of course, each individual advertiser is convinced that this year, this spot is going to break out and win it all. And, in fact there are the winners. Some win big in a short-term way. Budweiser’s 2014 pairing of its iconic Clydesdales with a puppy, in the widely heralded Puppy Love execution, didn’t only generate strong awareness and buzz for the brand – Communicus data suggests that it also had a significant impact on building favorability for the beer itself. Some win big over a longer period. GoDaddy first started advertising on the Super Bowl in 2005, and for the next seven years was highly effective in using the venue to build awareness of the company and its products. However, the brand has been off its game recently, having stalled in 2013, 2014 and 2015 in its use of the Super Bowl buy to leverage its way into the consideration set of those who are in the market for domain names and websites. For some Super Bowl advertisers, the allure may be more about getting to have a really good time developing creative concepts that become high-budget, talked about TV...

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Super Bowl marketing shift: Brands don’t have to play (on TV) to win
Jan30

Super Bowl marketing shift: Brands don’t have to play (on TV) to win

A number of large companies have decided to sit out advertising during this year’s Super Bowl, giving smaller brands and marketers with 360-degree campaigns a chance to shine during the big game on Sunday. M&M’s, H&M, Dannon, and a number of major automakers, such as Volkswagen, General Motors, Ford, and Lincoln are among those that have decided not to run ads at the NFL’s marquee event on Sunday. Yet even with the exorbitant price to run an ad, viewers don’t have to worry about a Super Bowl commercial drought, since many brands are joining the marketing madness for the first time or returning to the game after years away. “In the last few years, we’ve seen that some of the lesser-known brands have had the most impact because they’re not known yet, so you have this huge platform to get your name out there,” explains Jeri Smith, CEO of advertising research firm Communicus. Click HERE for...

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