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Super Bowl Frenzy, Part 50
Nov09

Super Bowl Frenzy, Part 50

It’s only early November, and CBS says that they’re almost sold out of ad inventory for Super Bowl 50, which will be held nearly 3 months from now, on February 7 of next year. What is it about this event that drives so many advertisers to line up to pay the going price of $5 million per :30 of commercial time, plus all of the production and PR costs that go along with the buy? It can’t be the numbers. On the basis of the conservatively estimated $10mm total investment, a typical CPG brand would have to sell 50 million additional units beyond what they would have sold without the commercial buy to recoup the investment. An auto company would have to sell over 7,000 additional cars which without that 30-second experience would have gone unsold to recover the cost of being on the Super Bowl. What’s more, we know the odds are stacked against this happening – while some commercials do better than others in breaking through and persuading, the average Super Bowl commercial achieves branded awareness among about 9.5 % of American adults, or 2.3 million consumers. Okay, that’s a pretty big number on the basis of a single exposure. However, the odds are only one in five that this one commercial exposure is going to actually convince a meaningful number of that 2.3 million consumers to do anything differently, in regards to the brand, than they otherwise would have. The math just doesn’t add up. But of course, each individual advertiser is convinced that this year, this spot is going to break out and win it all. And, in fact there are the winners. Some win big in a short-term way. Budweiser’s 2014 pairing of its iconic Clydesdales with a puppy, in the widely heralded Puppy Love execution, didn’t only generate strong awareness and buzz for the brand – Communicus data suggests that it also had a significant impact on building favorability for the beer itself. Some win big over a longer period. GoDaddy first started advertising on the Super Bowl in 2005, and for the next seven years was highly effective in using the venue to build awareness of the company and its products. However, the brand has been off its game recently, having stalled in 2013, 2014 and 2015 in its use of the Super Bowl buy to leverage its way into the consideration set of those who are in the market for domain names and websites. For some Super Bowl advertisers, the allure may be more about getting to have a really good time developing creative concepts that become high-budget, talked about TV...

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State Farm Makes Plans to Sell Car Insurance Customer Data
Jul15

State Farm Makes Plans to Sell Car Insurance Customer Data

State Farm has developed plans to sell customer data, allowing advertisers to create highly targeted pitches based on where, when and how people drive. In a patent application filed with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, State Farm proposes gathering information about drivers’ routes and stops from vehicles’ sensors, navigation systems, cameras or other devices. State Farm would send data on driver’s habits to “another unit or entity,” such as an advertising agency or vendor, and the agency would use this data to send the driver targeted radio or email ads. As the application explains, drivers might receive an ad for “Restaurant A” if they regularly visit similar restaurants. Click HERE for...

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An ad or a show? Some say YouTube Kids blurs the line
Apr22

An ad or a show? Some say YouTube Kids blurs the line

Pop quiz: Which of these are commercials? A video describing what McDonald’s Chicken McNuggets are made of. A video showing LEGO toys being opened and assembled. A video in which characters from the Disney movie “Frozen” drink Sprite. All appear on YouTube Kids, a new free app — described as “kid-friendly content” for “curious little minds” — that mixes ad-like videos with traditional shows. On Monday, a Boston consumer group told federal regulators it’s hard to tell the ads from the programming, so YouTube Kids should be subject to federal rules on deceptive advertising. Click HERE for...

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Super Bowl advertisers may resort to ‘guerrilla’ means to get eyes
Jan30

Super Bowl advertisers may resort to ‘guerrilla’ means to get eyes

In the high-stakes battle between advertisers at this year’s Super Bowl, top corporate brands such as Budweiser, Doritos and Pepsi are once again spending record amounts for precious time during Sunday’s big game. But some researchers and advertising veterans say a more low-key guerrilla marketing campaign might be a better option for companies who want to piggyback on the Super Bowl’s shoulder pads without breaking their ad budgets for the rest of the decade. Communicus’ Jeri Smith weighs in. Click HERE for...

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Communicus Weighs in on Super Bowl Ad Effectiveness on CBS MoneyWatch
Jan21

Communicus Weighs in on Super Bowl Ad Effectiveness on CBS MoneyWatch

With the Super Bowl typically scoring as the country’s most watched event of the year, the broadcast has no problem attracting some of America’s biggest advertisers. Yet squeezed in among returning stalwarts such as Anheuser-Busch’s Budweiser are often several newbies, brands that are ponying up $4 million or more to make their Super Bowl debuts. This year, the game will include several fresh faces during the commercial breaks, including cruise line Carnival Corp., the candy brand Skittles, and web development platform Wix.com. Click HERE for...

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